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moviecode:

In an episode of Dr. Who, The Doctor is seen examining an SVG file taken from Wikipedia. It depicts a light wave. (source: @popey)

In case you’ve ever wondered what the people in the movies were really looking at on their computer screens, there’s a Tumblr for that. 

unionmetrics:

moviecode:

In an episode of Dr. Who, The Doctor is seen examining an SVG file taken from Wikipedia. It depicts a light wave. (source: @popey)

In case you’ve ever wondered what the people in the movies were really looking at on their computer screens, there’s a Tumblr for that. 

If you want to be a creative person, then you’re gonna have to be creative in how you put your career together. There isn’t a path. Part of the creativity is making your path.

Enterprise Technology Catalogue

Check out this great new resource from Work-Bench: a catalogue of enterprise technology startups in NYC.

work—bench:

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Calling All Builders

October 18, 2013

At Work-Bench, we’re constantly searching for the next generation of tools that will define the future of work. In this search, we found that there was no central list of companies building better tools. We saw an opportunity to create a catalogue…

The Year in Robotic Seduction

"Boston Dynamics was as much its YouTube channel as it was a robotics firm."

explore-blog:

Louis CK, brilliantly hilarious as ever, uses his comedic genius to make a very serious point about the reality of violence against women.

Help change that.

(HT Hannah Rames)

marksbirch:

Grace Hopper, computer innovator, would have been 107 today
I had no idea who she was until I saw the Google doodle.  I took a snippet from Wikipedia so that you can understand how important she was to the field of computer science.  Every time you compile and debug code, it was Grace Hopper that made that a reality some fifty years prior.

Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and United States Navy Rear Admiral. A pioneer in the field, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language. She conceptualized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages. She is credited with popularizing the term “debugging” for fixing computer glitches (inspired by an actual moth removed from the computer). Owing to the breadth of her accomplishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as “Amazing Grace”. The U.S. Navy destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) is named for her, as was the Cray XE6 “Hopper” supercomputer at NERSC.

marksbirch:

Grace Hopper, computer innovator, would have been 107 today

I had no idea who she was until I saw the Google doodle.  I took a snippet from Wikipedia so that you can understand how important she was to the field of computer science.  Every time you compile and debug code, it was Grace Hopper that made that a reality some fifty years prior.

Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and United States Navy Rear Admiral. A pioneer in the field, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language. She conceptualized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages. She is credited with popularizing the term “debugging” for fixing computer glitches (inspired by an actual moth removed from the computer). Owing to the breadth of her accomplishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as “Amazing Grace”. The U.S. Navy destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) is named for her, as was the Cray XE6 “Hopper” supercomputer at NERSC.

The Guide to NYC Tech 2.0

schlafnotes:

At Lerer Ventures I created the first version of The Guide to NYC Tech after dozens of people asked me the same dozen questions, over and over. What are the best co-working spaces? Which lawyer should I hire? Where are good places to take a meeting? Who are the key investors to know? How do I…

Fantastic resource for NYC’s startup ecosystem!

When a Great Idea strikes out of the blue, it is tied in some metaphysical way to all that effort we’ve put in day after day churning through a mass of mundane notions.

Wonderful meditation on why “the best way to have a good idea is to have lots of ideas” by Scott Myers over at Go Into The Story, which is invariably excellent.

This notion was perhaps best articulated by iconic graphic designer Paula Scher, and powerfully intimated by 20-year-old Hunter S. Thompson. Or, as artist Austin Kleon put it, “you are a mashup of what you let into your life.” 

(via explore-blog)
In other words, the gene-centric model survives because simplicity is a hugely advantageous trait for an idea to possess. People will select a simple idea over a complex idea almost every time. This holds especially in a hostile environment, like, say, a sceptical crowd. For example, Sean B Carroll, professor of molecular biology and genetics at the University of Wisconsin, spends much of his time studying gene expression, but usually uses gene-centric explanations, because when talking to the public, he finds a simple story is a damned good thing to have.
I look for them to articulate a problem in the world and work backwards to the solution. Don’t start by showing a pretty solution and find a problem to try to attach it to.

New York City Accelerators, Incubators, and Coworking Spaces

marksbirch:

Since early last year when I last revisited my list of incubators, accelerators, and coworking spaces based in NYC, the options have literally exploded.Because of the vastly expanded number of facilities, I have instead posted a new listing instead of updating the old listing. What is certain…

Great resource.

When a man has done what he considers to be his duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace.
Nelson Mandela dies today at 95.
amritrichmond:

The Myth of the Innovator Hero from The Atlantic via Findings.
Busyness serves as a kind of existential reassurance, a hedge against emptiness; obviously your life cannot possibly be silly or trivial or meaningless if you are so busy, completely booked, in demand every hour of the day.

Don’t Fall into the trap.

The ‘Busy’ Trap - NYTimes.com (via courtenaybird)