01 3 / 2014

11 5 / 2013

brianwitlin:

I deeply subscribe and seek to embody the attributes of the Creative Leader.  This leadership philosophy has proven to be the better long-term way to drive:
innovation
risk-taking
strong team moral and loyalty
trust in leadership
strong communication
open-ness 
less egos
“we” versus “me” mentality
“build to learn” culture
a team that works well with uncertainty and ambiguity
forward thinking
success
strong product based on real world needs

brianwitlin:

I deeply subscribe and seek to embody the attributes of the Creative Leader.  This leadership philosophy has proven to be the better long-term way to drive:

  • innovation
  • risk-taking
  • strong team moral and loyalty
  • trust in leadership
  • strong communication
  • open-ness 
  • less egos
  • “we” versus “me” mentality
  • “build to learn” culture
  • a team that works well with uncertainty and ambiguity
  • forward thinking
  • success
  • strong product based on real world needs

05 1 / 2013

josephrizk:


capital efficiency-

Startups are often synonymous with risk. They’re started by founders with very unrealistic expectations of positive outcomes and who have little desire (or ability) to weigh actual probabilities of failure. If they did, they would likely be deterred from the visions…

06 12 / 2012

Ceci N’Est Pas Un … (Internet Defies Existing Categories) It is fascinating how the Internet is creating new entities and phenomena that defy existing categories. The challenge that arises is that many politicians and regulators still think in these old categories. Here are just a bunch of recent examples. Uber, Hailo, Lyft, Sidecar etc all enable transportation but are not cab companies. AirBnB, VRBO, HomeAway all enable lodging but are not hotels. Skillshare, Udacity, Udemy, Coursera, Khan Academy enable learning but are not schools. Blogs enable publishing of opinion but are not press. I am sure this list could be made much longer if I weren’t running out for a meeting. So if you have other examples please contribute them in the comments.

07 9 / 2012

Awesome NYTimes piece feat. @mc10inc “@TerawattVC: MC10: Big Data in Your Blood http://t.co/UOpFzefd” -x- http://bit.ly/P8Izct

06 9 / 2012

POSTED BY: EVAN ACKERMAN  /  TUE, SEPTEMBER 04, 2012

You’re a terrible driver. Yes, you. Terrible. At least, you’re terrible compared to a robot, which is smarter, faster, and more experienced. In fact, if we all just give up driving on highways and let robots take over for us, we could effectively end highway congestion as we know it by boosting the capacity of our existing roads by a staggering 273%.

On a highway filled to capacity by human drivers (which is about 2,200 vehicles per hour per lane), about five percent of the available road space is taken up by cars.Five percent. This is because humans are so bad at driving that we need lanes that are twice the size of our cars, and at highway speeds, we have to keep between 40 and 50 meters away from the car in front of us. 

Researchers at Colombia University took a look at what would happen if we started relying on autonomous or semi-autonomous cars equipped with sensors and/or intervehicular communications systems, and the increase in efficiency is fairly incredible, simply due to the fact that cars can safely travel  closer together. When traveling at 100 kph, if all vehicles on the road are simply equipped with adaptive cruise control, highway capacity can safely increase by a factor of 1.4. And if all vehicles on the road are equipped with both adaptive cruise sensors and communication, capacity can be increased by a factor of 3.7. And this increase is without any infrastructure modification: it’s purely from making our cars smarter with technology that is commercially available today.

So, with 100% communicating vehicles, you’ll get 12,000 vehicles per hour zipping along at 120 kph within about 6 meters of each other. Not too shabby, right? Of course, you have to keep in mind that we’ll likely to be limited by the percentage of adoption of these technologies, as illustrated in these graphs:

We may not notice the difference right away, but as more and more cars being to implement sensors and communication, the overall benefits will increase drastically.

Decreasing highway congestion is great, and we’re all for that. But, it’s really one of the more minor benefits of partially or fully autonomous vehicles. Benefit number one is obvious: a car that’s equipped wit a bunch of sensors and that knows what all the other cars around it are doing is a much safer place to be than a car driven by a human. I don’t care how good of a driver you are (or you think you are): your car, being for all practical purposes a robot, can digest a huge amount of data and make a decision about the best course of action to take in approximately the same amount of time it takes for you to move your foot from the gas to the brake. Our brains just don’t work fast enough to keep up, and if something goes wrong, your car will be vastly better than you are at keeping you (and your passengers) from harm.

The other big benefit that we’re looking forward to is the opportunity to not have to drive anymore, or at least, not have to pay attention while driving. A car that drives itself (at least on the highway) would give us the chance to be productive instead of wasting our lives going from Point A to Point B and then back five days a week. Plus, robot cars never get distracted, never get tired, never talk on the phone, never spill coffee on themselves, and don’t care in the least about how attractive the person is in the car alongside. The fact is, robots have the potential to be the ideal chauffeurs for all of us.

Every time we talk about robot cars we have to mention two things. Thing One is that all of the technology to do this stuff already exists. And not just in Google’s fully autonomous cars: there are cars that you can buy today that have adaptive cruise control that can sense the cars in front of them, blind spot sensors that can see cars to the side, and lane sensors that can track lane markings. Vehicle to vehicle communication is nearly a reality too, and the technology has been successfully demonstrated in Europe in the form of road trains.

Thing Two is that the world just isn’t ready for robot cars. The government has no idea how to manage them, and manufacturers are understandably concerned about liability. Here, though, things have started to move a little bit, with first Nevada and now California passing legislation governing their testing and use. This isn’t going to be a fast transition, but when it happens, it’ll be one of the biggest transportation revolutions since the invention of, let’s say, walking.

Highway Capacity Benefits from Using Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communication and Sensors for Collision Avoidance, by Patcharinee Tientrakool, Ya-Chi Ho, and Nicholas F. Maxemchuk from Columbia University, was presented last year at the IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference.

Via [ NBF ]

05 9 / 2012

wildcat2030:

MC10, a startup in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is getting ready to commercialize high-­performance electronics that can stretch. The technology could lead to such products as skin patches that monitor whether the wearer is sufficiently hydrated, or inflatable balloon catheters equipped with sensors that measure electrical misfiring caused by cardiac arrhythmias. 
Microelectronics have long “depended on a rigid, brittle wafer,” says David Icke, MC10’s CEO. MC10 uses a few tricks to change that. To make both the hydration-­sensing patch and the catheter, gold electrodes and wires just a few hundred nanometers thick are deposited on silicon wafers by conventional means, then peeled off and applied to stretchable polymers. The serpentine wires elongate when the polymers stretch, either when the balloon inflates in the heart or as the patch moves around on the skin. The electrodes measure electrical impedance to detect the electrical signals in cardiac tissue or moisture levels in the skin.
(via Making Stretchable Electronics - Technology Review)

wildcat2030:

MC10, a startup in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is getting ready to commercialize high-­performance electronics that can stretch. The technology could lead to such products as skin patches that monitor whether the wearer is sufficiently hydrated, or inflatable balloon catheters equipped with sensors that measure electrical misfiring caused by cardiac arrhythmias.

Microelectronics have long “depended on a rigid, brittle wafer,” says David Icke, MC10’s CEO. MC10 uses a few tricks to change that. To make both the hydration-­sensing patch and the catheter, gold electrodes and wires just a few hundred nanometers thick are deposited on silicon wafers by conventional means, then peeled off and applied to stretchable polymers. The serpentine wires elongate when the polymers stretch, either when the balloon inflates in the heart or as the patch moves around on the skin. The electrodes measure electrical impedance to detect the electrical signals in cardiac tissue or moisture levels in the skin.

(via Making Stretchable Electronics - Technology Review)

03 7 / 2012

13 4 / 2012

digitalsweetcandy:

Bulletin Board @ General Assembly NYC

digitalsweetcandy:

Bulletin Board @ General Assembly NYC

(Source: digitalsweet-candy)

10 4 / 2012

Why Cleanweb Beats Cleantech by Sunil Paul and Nick Allen (by Nick Allen) -  listen to the  talk that Sunil Paul gave on cleanweb at this year’s SXSW. 

Cleanweb leverages information technology for energy and resource gains. “It’s cleantech at web speed.” 

20 3 / 2012

thisistheverge:

Researchers use Lego to help build artificial bones! Don’t miss the video.

thisistheverge:

Researchers use Lego to help build artificial bones! Don’t miss the video.

(via emergentfutures)

11 2 / 2012

nevrfail:

Tesla unveils Model X crossover electric car
(details)
www.neverfail.co

nevrfail:

Tesla unveils Model X crossover electric car

(details)

www.neverfail.co

04 2 / 2012


23 Unusual Ways to Apply Crowdfunding | World Future Societywfs.org
Novem­ber 2009 was when Michael Migliozzi and Brian Fla­tow start­ed a web­site called BuyaBeerCompany.com who’s lofty goal was to buy the ail­ing cen­tu­ry old Pabst Blue Rib­bon beer com­pa­ny. In less than two years, work­ing to match the $300…

23 Unusual Ways to Apply Crowdfunding | World Future Society
wfs.org

Novem­ber 2009 was when Michael Migliozzi and Brian Fla­tow start­ed a web­site called BuyaBeerCompany.com who’s lofty goal was to buy the ail­ing cen­tu­ry old Pabst Blue Rib­bon beer com­pa­ny. In less than two years, work­ing to match the $300…

(Source: futuramb)

28 12 / 2011

Harvard #Innovation Lab promotes #entrepreneurship - good piece in Harvard mag. http://t.co/Osv7Dc3C

23 12 / 2011

The National #Science Foundation #Innovation Corps – Class 2: The Business Model Canvas - Steve Blank: http://t.co/F3uuhwe4 #startup